Enology projects

A survey of S. Cerevisiae yeast populations in 3 Okanagan vineyard sub-regions
Author:
Dr. Vivien Measday - UBC Vancouver, Wine Research Centre
Date:
Friday, February 26, 2016
Classic breeding of low volatile acidity and low hydrogen sulphide producing yeast strains
Author:
Dr. H. van Vuuren
Date:
Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Acetic acid in wine is generally considered to be a spoilage product; acetic acid production can also result in the formation of other unpleasant volatile compounds such as ethyl acetate. By creating a single point mutation in the S. cerevisiae YML081W locus, we can reduce VA in wine by 32%. The production of H2S is a significant problem in the wine industry around the world. The pathways for H2S production have been studied by many laboratories around the world but it has not been fully elucidated. We have now identified a novel gene that regulates H2S production during wine fermentations.  By classic breeding we can mutate the S. cerevisiae YDL068W gene which will significantly limit/prevent the formation of H2S in wine.
Population Dynamics of Yeast Fermenting Pinot Noir and Chardonnay Wine
Author:
Dr. Dan Durall
Date:
Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Knowing the yeasts that ferment wine will aid Okanagan wineries in their future yeast-purchasing decisions and will give Okanagan winemakers more confidence in using spontaneous fermentation. Given that a substantial amount of a winery’s capital is spent on commercial yeast, these actions will increase the efficiency by which yeasts are used, resulting in cost reductions. Also, by knowing the yeasts fermenting the wine will lead to intelligent winemaking decisions and general increase in wine quality. There are two types of fermentations: spontaneous and inoculated. In spontaneous fermentation, the must is exposed to the resident yeast population, whereas in inoculated fermentation, a commercially available S. cerevisiae yeast starter is used as an inoculant. The aim of the proposed study is to determine the yeasts present in inoculated and spontaneous fermentations in Pinot Noir and Chardonnay varietals. We will also aim to build our microsatellite database by adding DNA fingerprints of S. cerevisiae strains that were not listed in previously constructed databases.
Analytical and sensory evaluation of tannins in red wines and grapes
Author:
Dr. Cedric Saucier
Date:
Thursday, July 1, 2010
Dr. Cedric Saucier UBC-Okanagan
Establishment and Application of a Small-lot Research Winery to Determine the Winemaking Quality of Grapes from Viticulture Rese
Author:
Dr. Pat Bowen – PARC – Summerland
Date:
Sunday, January 1, 2006
Proposed is the establishment of a small-lot research wine making facility at PARC Summerland, and use of the facility to make wines from viticulture research projects underway. The facility will enable assessment of the wine making quality of fruit produced in response to viticultural research treatments, and relationships among fruit and wine composition and wine sensory characteristics. The facility could also potentially be used to assess wine sensory characteristics that result from site conditions (terroir effects). Establishment of the small-lot facility at PARC will also create a new training opportunity for students.
Estimation of Brett Odor in Wines
Author:
Nigel J. Eggers – UBC Okanagan
Date:
Sunday, January 1, 2006
Brett is probably resident in most Okanagan wineries, but is kept in check by current sterile techniques, and the 4-ethylguaiacol and 4-ethylphenol concentrations are very likely well below their thresholds. The concentrations of these two compounds can be used to monitor the effectiveness of Brettanomyces control programs. This analytical method for estimating the extent of Brettanomyces contamination is rapid and will quickly provide information regarding the effectiveness of the sterile techniques. The study of Brettanomyces infection will take into account many variables and will include the following: age of barrel, cooper, block of grapes, variety of grapes, hygiene (hot versus cold water, sterilizing agent), type of oak used in barrels, sulphur dioxide concentration, cellar temperature, and dissolved oxygen.
Estimation of Smoke Contamination on Wine Grapes
Author:
Nigel J. Eggers – UBC Okanagan
Date:
Wednesday, November 1, 2006
The goal of this proposal is to develop an analytical technique to measure guaiacol and 4-methylguaiacol in grape, which are the compounds responsible for the smoke taint in wines. We have frozen grapes remaining from a previous study. We will then measure these compounds in grapes from Okanagan vineyards that were contaminated by the fire in 2003 and compare these results with grapes harvested in 2001 and 2002 from the same vineyards. We thus hope to develop the ability to quantitatively determine whether wines will have a “smoky” flavour or aroma.
Brett Odor Project Results Summary
Author:
Brett Odour
Date:
Tuesday, August 1, 2006
View attached .pdf file.